Lee-Enfield No. 4 MK. I (T) sniper rifle

1944 Lee-Enfield No4 MKI (T) BSA sniper rifle -
Lee-Enfield 1944 Lee-Enfield No4 MKI (T) BSA sniper rifle – right side

The Lee-Enfield No. 4 Mk. I (T)  and No. 4 MK. I* (T) were the standard WWII sniper rifles for the British and for the Commonwealth, except for Australia. Prior to their creation a variety of WWI sniper rifles were in use. These included the Ross MK. III sniper rifle and Enfield No. 3 MK. I sniper variants. The Australians built their own sniper variant based upon the No. 1 MK. III rifle (the old SMLE design) using a heavy barrel.

In 1941 and early 1942, 1,403 Lee-Enfield No. 4 MK. I rifles were converted at Royal Small Arms Factory Enfield. Most, but not all, of these were 1931 and 1933 Trials rifles. A few were Stevens-Savage made in the USA and a few may have been made by Maltby and BSA. Rifles converted by them are marked with a tiny Enfield examiner’s stamp on the top of the front scope pad.

Late in 1942 a contract was issued to Holland and Holland, the famous gunmakers in London, England, to convert rifles into sniper equipment. Rifles converted by them were marked “S51″ in 1/4” high letters on the underside of the butt.

This web page will eventually go into detail on these rifles. I wish to thank the many collectors and museums who have granted me access to photograph their items.

SMALL ARMS LIMITED (S.A.L.) at LONG BRANCH

The Canadian sniper rifles were produced at Small Arms Limited at Long Branch (two words) Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

On flikr there are some albums of official photos posted by Gary Blakeley. Two of the photos in “Small Arms Ltd., Company Photo Album” show sniper rifles. That external web site is here  At this time (2016-08-24) he has 4 albums. The second and fouth albums are of Small Arms Limited at Long Branch where the Lee-Enfield No. 4 rifles and the Sten Gun MK. II were made. The wooden shoulder stock/holster for the Inglis pistol was also made at SAL. The first and third albums are of John Inglis Company which made Browning Machine Guns, Bren Guns and No. 1 and No. 2 pistols (versions of the Browning High Power Model 35). NFB is “National Film Board” of Canada which did a lot of documentary film work. Low resolution copies of those two images are shown here. Below are links to higher quality images on flickr.

SAL Long Branch Princess Alice and display firearms
SAL Long Branch Princess Alice and display firearms
SAL Long Branch example firearms close-up
SAL Long Branch example firearms close-up

 

  • Chinese contract wooden holster for the Inglis No. 1 MK. I pistol.
  • Long Branch Training Rifle (non-firing). similar in concept to the British Swift Training Rifle apparently.
  • No. 5 Mk. I “Jungle Carbine” prototype. This model was not manufactured in Canada other than prototype(s).
  • No. 4 Lightweight . Notice lightening cuts in fore end and butt.
  • No. 4 MK. I* (T) with a British style mount for No. 32 and No. 67 scopes. It appers to be a No. 32 scope. Butt has British style cheek rest on top and butt plate is standard metal one.
  • No. 4 MK. I* (T) It looks like a Trade Pattern with Canadian variation of U.S. Griffin & Howe  mount and Lyman Alaskan scope but with the Canadian Monte Carlo type butt and rubber butt-pad.
  • No. 4 MK. I* (T) with what may be a No. 67 MK. I scope and Canadian Monte Carlo cheekiest and rubber butt pad.
  • No. 4 MK. I* with MK. II simple “L” back sight. This appears to be a standard mid-war production specimen.
SAL Long Branch men - sniper scopes visible in foreground
SAL Long Branch men – sniper scopes visible in foreground
"C" Coy 1 Canadian Parachute Battalion and King George VI May 1944 Two snipers are in the front rank. Pte. Peter Braidwood (2nd from left) and Pte. Cliff Douglas (3rd from left)
“C” Coy 1 Canadian Parachute Battalion and King George VI May 1944 Two snipers are in the front rank. Pte. Peter Braidwood (2nd from left) and Pte. Cliff Douglas (3rd from left)
Peter Braidwood CCoy1CPB 2015-05-06 w 1943 sniper rifle
Peter Braidwood CCoy1CPB 2015-05-06 w 1943 sniper rifle

 

Private Peter Braidwood parachuted into Normandy carrying a No. 4 MK. I (T) with 1 Canadian Parachute battalion in the 6th Airborne Division. He also carried one in the Battle of the Bulge when 6 AB Div was sent over by sea and land, due to the bad weather, to reinforce the Americans. Peter was issued another No. 4 MK. I (T) but as it had shrapnel in the furniture, he managed to “accidentally” drop it during a practice parachute jump. He was issued a fresh No. 4 MK. I (T) which he carried on the Operation Varsity parachute jump into Germany in March 1945 and on the advance to Wismar to cut the Soviets off from illegally occupying Denmark. The scope shown here, No. 32 MK. I serial number 7466,  was issued to 1 Canadian Parachute Battalion, so it is possibly one that Peter carried in battle. The scope only was brought back as a souvenir by Private George Siggs of 1 Can Para Bn. Sadly Peter Braidwood died less than a week after I took this photo. The scope 7466 is shown here mounted on an early British sniper rifle, a 1943 BSA Shirley serial number AT4872 made No. 4 MK. I (T) which is now in a private collection in Quebec fitted with a different scope.

Long Branch No. 4 MK.I* (T) Trade Pattern. Two of the 350 sniper rifles built by Canada that were fitted with U.S. made Lyman Alaskan No. 32 TP MK. I scope. Both sets are matching. The two "orphaned" scopes are originals. The upper one is in a Roger Payne replica slide and the bottom one is in an original slide. The scope case C No. 18 MK. I matched the bottom rifle with its scope.
Long Branch No. 4 MK.I* (T) Trade Pattern. Two of the 350 sniper rifles built by Canada that were fitted with U.S. made Lyman Alaskan No. 32 TP MK. I scope. Both sets are matching. The two “orphaned” scopes are originals. The upper one is in a Roger Payne replica slide and the bottom one is in an original slide. The scope case C No. 18 MK. I matched the bottom rifle with its scope.

 

More to come …

Korea - PPCLI sniper with a Long Branch No.4 MK. I*(T) fitted with C No 67 Mk I scope
Korea – PPCLI sniper with a Long Branch No.4 MK. I*(T) fitted with C No 67 Mk I scope

OUTISDE LINKS

M1907 Sling – This was an American sling that was the normal issue with the No. 4 (T) sniper rifles.

  • US M1907 Sling (search those words in that order. Direct link not shown as their web site is not secure)
  • M1907 SLING INSTALLATION by the Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) in the USA (Direct link not shown as their web site is not secure)
  • The Use of the M1907 Sling by Walt Kuleck – Fulton Armory  From FM 23-5, Octorber 1951 (Direct link not shown as their web site is not secure)